NECK PAIN ON THE BIKE – COULD YOUR ABDOMINALS BE THE PROBLEM?

I find it extraordinary that in my years of reading articles and books about pain and discomfort while cycling, I have never found a discussion of the potential impact of the abdominal muscles on neck pain. This is striking because there is a remarkably direct connection between the abdominal muscles and the neck, and this connection can be particularly problematic for cyclists due to the very nature of the position of the human body on a bicycle. While there are a variety of potential causes for neck pain in cyclists, the link between the abs and the neck should not be overlooked.

HOW TO REPLICATE YOUR IDEAL BIKE FIT ON ALL OF YOUR BIKES (WITH DOWNLOADABLE WORKSHEET)

3 bikes with same positional setup angles and distances
3 bikes with same positional setup angles and distances
Three bikes, all with the same relationship between the bottom bracket, saddle tip, and bar center. Note that the saddle model and handlebar reach/drop are the same on all bikes. The shifters are different, which may require a bit of minor adjustment on each bike.

If you’re like many serious cyclists, you probably own more than one bike. Whether due to having different bikes for different conditions, having a backup on hand when our main ride is in the shop, or just the inability to keep from buying the latest and greatest toy on the market, most of us tend to find ourselves with a variety of horses in the stable.

From a performance and injury-prevention standpoint, we would to prefer to find an “ideal” bike fit on one bike that maximizes efficiency, performance and comfort, and then precisely replicate that fit on each of our other bikes. Many cyclists struggle to achieve this consistency of fit, however. What with different seat tube angles, top tube lengths, bottom bracket heights, and the rest of a seemingly innumerable list of variables, many riders find themselves constantly fiddling to try to eliminate the knee twinge they feel on the Trek, the neck strain they feel on the Specialized, or the numb hands they get on the Giant.

BETTER CORE EXERCISES FOR CYCLISTS – LIVE CLINIC WITH ARTEMIS RACING

A strong core is important for cycling performance and injury prevention. But many “expert” recommendations just plug in some standard exercises without considering whether they are truly ideal for cyclists.

Dr. Renee Roth Powers has some groundbreaking views on core exercises, and believes that some of the “standards” should be reconsidered for cyclists.

In this video of a live clinic held with Artemis racing, you’ll learn why standards like the front plank, side plank, crunches, and bird dog are not really ideal for the cyclist, and how you can learn to spot better core exercises that actually make a difference! Plus, you’ll get some new exercise ideas and get expert teaching on how to perform them.

There are plans to eventually do a more scripted, studio version of this clinic presentation, which will have even more detail and more new exercises (and better audio). So check out this live clinic video for now, and be sure to follow Fundamental Velo on Twitter or Facebook to hear about every new article and video. There’s a lot in the pipeline!

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